Dollar Demand Endures Even as Stocks Improve

Stocks Improve

The Delta variant of the COVID-19 displaced inflation as investors’ primary cause of worries this week. Hence, causing global stocks to fall distinctly on Monday. European equity markets pulled up on Wednesday, and Wall Street futures led to a firmer open.

By 1120 GMT, the dollar index was higher 0.1% at 93.055. In early trading, it reached 93.194, the most distinguished after April 1.

Joel Kruger, the currency strategist at LMAX Group, stated that the risk-averse mood and inflation concerns combined forces to push the dollar higher.

It’s becoming more difficult for the Fed to adjust its position that inflation is transitory. At some point, the meaning of transitory is under question, he stated.

Kruger anticipates more dollar strength in the third quarter, with the dollar index going towards 96 to 97.

As a liquid proxy for risk appetite, the Australian dollar dropped to its weakest after November in early trading before rallying somewhat. At 1124 GMT, it was below 0.2% on the day at $0.73135, while the New Zealand dollar was higher at 0.1% at $0.6924.

 

Lockdown Restrictions Rising

 

Australia’s two most extensive states recorded definite increases in new coronavirus cases on Wednesday. This is a setback to hopes that lockdown restrictions would be raised as more than half the country’s population was subjected to stay-at-home orders.

After February, the British pound, which on Tuesday scored its weakest after February, was below 0.1% at $1.3616.

Analysts led to a stand-off between Britain and the European Union. Prime Minister Boris Johnson announced that his government would describe its approach to the Northern Ireland Protocol to Britain’s parliament on Wednesday. Coronavirus cases in Britain are also growing.

The euro was under 0.4% versus the commodity-dependent Norwegian crown. The pair was trading at 10.5722 related to 10.7038 in the prior session, a seven-month low for the crown.

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